Principal Investigators

Theme 1
- Agile System Development

Theme 2
- Algorithm-Driven Architectures

Theme 3
- Technology-Driven Systems

Sarita Adve

Sarita Adve is the Richard T. Cheng Professor of Computer Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Her research interests are at the hardware-software interface and her work has spanned computer architecture, programming languages, operating systems, and applications. Adve received the Ph.D. in Computer Science from Wisconsin in 1993 and a B.Tech. in Electrical Engineering from IIT-Bombay in 1987.

Amarasinghe

Saman Amarasinghe is a Professor and Associate Department Head in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT.  He leads the Commit compiler research group in MIT’s Computer Science & Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL). Amarasinghe received a bachelor’s degree from Cornell University in 1988, a master’s degree and PhD in electrical engineering from Stanford University in 1990 and 1997 respectively, and joined MIT as an assistant professor in 1997.

Todd Austin

Todd Austin is a Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. His research interests include computer architecture, robust and secure system design, hardware and software verification, and performance analysis tools and techniques. Austin received his PhD in Computer Science from the University of Wisconsin in 1996.

Alice Melloni

Christopher Batten is an Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Cornell University, specializing in computer architecture and VLSI design. His research interests include energy-efficient programmable accelerators, parallel programming frameworks, and productive chip-design methodologies. Batten received a PhD in EECS from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, an MPhil in Engineering from the University of Cambridge, and a BS in EE from the University of Virginia.

Valeria Bertacco

Valeria Bertacco is Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Associate Dean in the Rackham Graduate School at the University of Michigan. Her research interests are in computer design, with emphasis on specialized architecture solutions and design viability, in particular reliability, validation and hardware-security assurance. She received her M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University and a Computer Engineering degree from the University of Padova, Italy.

David Brooks

David Brooks is the Haley Family Professor of Computer Science at Harvard University. He received his B.S. in Electrical Engineering at the University of Southern California and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering at Princeton University. His research interests include computer design at the hardware-software interface.

Wen-Mei Hwu

Wen-mei W. Hwu is a Professor and holds the Sanders-AMD Endowed Chair in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His research interests are in the area of architecture, implementation, compilation, and algorithms for parallel computing. Hwu received his Ph.D. degree in Computer Science from the University of California, Berkeley.

Baris Kasikci

Baris Kasikci is an assistant professor in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department at the University of Michigan. His research is centered around developing techniques, tools, and environments that help developers build more reliable, secure, and efficient software. He completed his PhD in the Dependable Systems Laboratory at EPFL.

Wei Lu

Wei Lu is a Professor in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science department at the University of Michigan and Director of the Lurie Nanofabrication Facility. His research interest includes resistive-random access memory (RRAM) devices, RRAM-based logic circuits, neuromorphic computing systems, and electrical transport in low-dimensional systems. He is an IEEE Fellow, a recipient of the NSF CAREER award, and co-founder of Crossbar, Inc.

Brandon Lucia

Brandon Lucia is an Assistant Professor in the Electrical and Computer Engineering department at Carnegie Mellon University. His research focuses on programming languages, software systems, and computer architecture, especially for intermittent computing on energy-harvesting systems, and efficient edge computing. His website is https://brandonlucia.com and his group's papers and research artifacts are available at http://intermittent.systems.

Sharad Malik

Sharad Malik is the George Van Ness Lothrop Professor of Engineering and the Chair of the Department of Electrical Engineering at Princeton University. His research focuses on design methodology and design automation for computing systems. His research in functional timing analysis and propositional satisfiability has been widely used in industrial electronic design automation tools.

Margaret Martonosi

Margaret Martonosi is the Hugh Trumbull Adams '35 Professor of Computer Science at Princeton University, where she has been on the faculty since 1994. Martonosi's research interests are in computer architecture and mobile computing, with particular focus on power-efficient systems. Martonosi completed her Ph.D. at Stanford University, and also holds a Master's degree from Stanford and a bachelor's degree from Cornell University, all in Electrical Engineering.

Adrian Sampson

Adrian Sampson is an assistant professor in the computer science department at Cornell University. He works on programming languages, computer architecture, and the abstractions that separate them. He sees approximate computing as an instance of a broader breakdown of airtight distinctions between hardware and software concerns. Adrian graduated from the University of Washington in 2015 and from Harvey Mudd College in 2009.

Julian Shun

Julian Shun is an Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT.  He obtained a Ph.D. in Computer Science from Carnegie Mellon University and an undergraduate degree in Computer Science from UC Berkeley. He is interested in the theory and practice of parallel computing, especially parallel graph processing frameworks, algorithms, data structures, and tools for deterministic parallel programming.

Dennis Sylvester

Dennis Sylvester is Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He received a PhD from the University of California, Berkeley in Electrical Engineering. His research interests include the design of millimeter-scale computing systems and energy efficient near-threshold computing.

Zachart Tatlock

Zachary Tatlock is an Assistant Professor in Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Washington where he is a member of the Programming Languages and Software Engineering (PLSE) group. He received his PhD from UC San Diego and BS from Purdue. His research draws upon proof assistants, SMT solvers, and type systems to improve software reliability and security in domains ranging from distributed systems and compilers to numerical approximation and web browser security.

Michael Taylor

Michael Bedford Taylor is a professor in both the CSE and EE departments at the University of Washington. His research interests include ASIC Clouds, open source hardware, dark silicon, tiled multicore architecture, HLS accelerators for mobile, and Bitcoin mining hardware. Taylor received a PhD in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Gu-Yeon Wei

Gu-Yeon Wei is Robert and Suzanne Case Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at Harvard University and currently serves as Area Chair for Electrical Engineering. He received his BS, MS, and PhD degrees in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University. His research interests span multiple layers of a computing system: mixed-signal integrated circuits, computer architecture, and design tools for efficient hardware.

Thomas Wenisch

Thomas Wenisch is an Associate Professor of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Michigan, specializing in computer architecture. His ongoing work focuses on algorithmic accelerators, data center architecture, memory persistency, and accelerators for medical imaging. Wenisch received his Ph.D. in Electrical and Computer Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University.